Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

Samples v. Geico Indemnity Co.

United States District Court, M.D. Florida, Tampa Division

December 11, 2019

DAVID SAMPLES, Plaintiff,
v.
GEICO INDEMNITY COMPANY, Defendant.

          ORDER GRANTING DEFENDANT “GEICO INDEMNITY COMPANY'S MOTION TO DISMISS COMPLAINT”

          TOM BARBER UNITED STATES DISTRICT JUDGE.

         This matter is before the Court on Defendant “GEICO Indemnity Company's Motion to Dismiss Complaint” (Doc. # 3), filed by counsel on October 3, 2019. Plaintiff did not file a response in opposition to the motion. After reviewing the motion, court file, and the record, the Court finds as follows:

         On November 8, 2018, Plaintiff David Samples was involved in a motorcycle accident. On August 21, 2019, he filed a three-count complaint in state court against Defendant GEICO Indemnity Company (GEICO) alleging (1) breach of contract; (2) uninsured motorist (UM) benefits; and (3) violations of § 624.144, Florida Statutes (bad faith). On September 26, 2019, GEICO removed this action to federal court based on diversity jurisdiction. In GEICO's motion to dismiss, it contends (1) the complaint constitutes a shotgun pleading, and (2) Count III should be dismissed without prejudice because the bad faith claim is premature. The Court agrees.

         Legal Standard

         Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 8(a) requires that a complaint contain “a short and plain statement of the claim showing the [plaintiff] is entitled to relief.” Fed.R.Civ.P. 8(a). “Although Rule 8(a) does not require ‘detailed factual allegations,' it does require ‘more than labels and conclusions'; a ‘formulaic recitation of the cause of action will not do.'” Young v. Lexington Ins. Co., No. 18-62468, 2018 WL 7572240, at *1 (S.D. Fla. Dec. 6, 2018), report and recommendation adopted, No. 18-62468-CIV, 2019 WL 1112274 (S.D. Fla. Jan. 9, 2019) (quoting Bell Atl. Corp. v. Twombly, 550 U.S. 544 (2007)). In order to survive a motion to dismiss, factual allegations must be sufficient “to state a claim for relief that is plausible on its face.” Twombly, 550 U.S. at 555.

         When deciding a Rule 12(b)(6) motion, review is generally limited to the four corners of the complaint. Rickman v. Precisionaire, Inc., 902 F.Supp. 232, 233 (M.D. Fla. 1995). Furthermore, when reviewing a complaint for facial sufficiency, a court “must accept [a] [p]laintiff's well pleaded facts as true, and construe the [c]omplaint in the light most favorable to the [p]laintiff.” Id. (citing Scheuer v. Rhodes, 416 U.S. 232, 236 (1974)).

         Analysis

         Shotgun Pleading

         A shotgun pleading is one where “it is virtually impossible to know which allegations of fact are intended to support which claim(s) for relief” and the defendant therefore cannot be “expected to frame a responsive pleading.” See Anderson v. Dist. Bd. Of Trustees of Cent. Fla. Cmty. College, 77 F.3d 364, 366 (11th Cir. 1996). The Eleventh Circuit has identified four primary types of shotgun pleadings:

(1) Complaints containing multiple counts where each count adopts the allegations of all preceding counts, causing each successive count to carry all that came before and the last count to be a combination of the entire complaint;
(2) Complaints that do not commit the mortal sin of re-alleging all preceding counts but are guilty of the venial sin of being replete with conclusory, vague, and immaterial facts not obviously connected to any particular cause of action;
(3) Complaints that commit the sin of not separating into a different count each cause of action or claim for relief; and
(4) Complaints that assert multiple claims against multiple defendants without specifying which of the defendants are responsible for which actions or omissions, or which of the defendants the claim is brought against.

Weiland v. Palm Beach Cty. Sheriff's Office, 792 F.3d 1313, 1322-23 (11th Cir. 2015). A district court must generally permit a plaintiff at least one opportunity to amend a shotgun complaint's deficiencies before dismissing the complaint with prejudice. Vibe Micro, ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.